Whitworth Stories

Video of Jason’s Whitworth Easter Story. You can watch it here, or read the whole story below!

Walter Crane (1845 – 1915) ‘Sketch depicting Lancelot Crane as a rabbit,’ the Whitworth, the University of Manchester.

After a busy morning of tidying and eating, a little white rabbit relaxes and begins reading the local newspaper. 

Inside she finds an advert for the local Easter Art Festival.

Walter Crane (1845 – 1915) ‘The Easter Art Annual for 1898’ the Whitworth, the University of Manchester.

“THIS WEEKEND, DO NOT MISS! 

THERE WILL BE A PARADE WITH OUR TOWN’S MOST PRIZED EASTER EGG AND IF THAT WASN’T ENOUGH, WE’VE OPENED A COMPETITION FOR YOU TO ENTER A PIECE TO GO IN THE PARADE!

Brief: What does Easter mean to you?

JUDGING TAKES PLACE THIS FRIDAY AT 10AM”

That’s tomorrow! The Rabbit realises.

Robert Tanner (b.1904) ‘Martin’s Hovel’ the Whitworth, the University of Manchester.

She looks around her home. With little to inspire her, she hops to the local woods for inspiration

John Northcote Nash (1893 – 1977) ‘Wood Interior,’ (1920) the Whitworth, the University of Manchester.

Along a windy path with tall trees spread out on either side, sunlight pierces through from gaps to the right, giving the rabbit a different view of the woods, and nature all together.

Around the rabbit, twigs fall and snap, bushes rustle with the sweep of the wind, and birdsongs fill the woods in harmony

The rabbit looks to the right, in a tree, rest a small flock of birds

Walter Crane (1845 – 1915) ‘Design for head-piece from ‘Stories of the Olden Time from Joinville and Froissart,’ the Whitworth, the University of Manchester

In the middle of the two sunbathing birds, one bird can be seen feeding chicks. 

The excited chicks tweet and stretch their beaks out, eager for more food.

An impatient chick pushes forward and knocks a loose twig from the nest, falling gracefully to the ground.

It is there that the rabbit sees something that sparks inspiration, and moments later, rushes back home.

Walter Crane (1845 – 1915) ‘Study of a garden at night,’ (1878) the Whitworth, the University of Manchester.

As the moon comes out over a clear night sky, the rabbit continues working through the night.

Walter Crane (1845 – 1915) ‘Illustrations from the Black Books Series: Crane and Fox,’ the Whitworth, the University of Manchester.

At the judging event, a crane inspects every inch of the artworks. In some cases, even inside them…

As the crane moves onto the last entry, it sees a small sculpture.

William Goodall (1757 – 1844) Flower Study, Fritillaria Pyrenaica, the Whitworth, the University of Manchester.

It’s a small but tall sculpture of a purple flower. The flower head hangs down and open.

The judge asks “why did you choose a flower?”

The rabbit replies that it represents life. 

That when the flower opens and the seeds fall, new life is born, similar to that of an Easter Egg.

Moved by the rabbit’s words, the crane makes it’s decision. 

Margaret Nicholls ‘The Pink Hut, near Cartmel, Lancashire,’ the Whitworth, the University of Manchester.

The Pink Hut, near Cartmel, Lancashire by Margaret Nicholls
Accession no. D.1928.2

On the day of the parade, the sun shines over the town bathing the area in a warm Spring glow. 

As the floats make their way through the town, all eyes are drawn to the central float. 

Walter Crane (1845 – 1915) ‘Illustration from the Black Book Series: Butterflies I Saw in the Wood at Boxhill, April 17 1881,’ the Whitworth, the University of Manchester.



William Goodall (1757 – 1844) Flower Study, Fritillaria Pyrenaica, the Whitworth, the University of Manchester.

It is there that sits the town’s beloved Easter egg, along with a new entry. The sculpture of a purple flower.

Thank you for listening.

Happy Easter!

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